Discover your Placement Site in Rhineland-Palatinate

 

We have placements in all areas throughout Rhineland-Palatinate. No matter where and no matter what you're interested in. Here you can find all the placements in the respective locations. When you click on a location, you will be shown the placements available there. Discover your perfect match!

We have placements in all areas throughout Rhineland-Palatinate. No matter where and no matter what you're interested in. Here you can find all the placements in the respective locations. When you click on a location, you will be shown the placements available there. Discover your perfect match!

Tasks at your Placement Site

In general, your placement can look a bit different in each location compared to another. Furthermore, you can also incorporate your own interests and strengths, so your placement can be quite different from that of your predecessor. If you are unsure about a task, whether or how you can fulfill it, always be sure to talk to your supervisor at the placement. The placement has the professional oversight, meaning overall responsibility for your placement. If you want to discuss things further, reach out to your education coordinator at the Red Cross. 

In general, we have provided you with a brief overview here of what to expect in the various areas and what not.

 

 

  • Pedagogical Sector

    Institutions in the pedagogical sector can include:

    • Schools (full-time, primary school, special school, secondary school)
    • Kindergartens
    • After-school care centers
    • Youth centers
    • Family Help Centers
    • ...

    You should:

    • Get to know the different educational styles and goals in your institution
    • Experience "closeness and distance" to the people you're supervising
    • Discover your own limits and strengths
    • Learn various pedagogical methods
    • Be able to integrate your personality into the daily work.

    Tasks can be quite specific, such as:

    • Assisting in the planning, preparation, and execution of group activities, such as games, crafts, reading, break-time activities, media design, and accompanying outings.
    • Organizing recreational activities with the people you are supervising
    • Practicing practical life skills, such as personal hygiene and handling money and material values
    • Accompanying and assisting with outings and events
    • Supporting homework supervision
    • Assisting with extracurricular activities
    • Supporting lunchtime care
    • Assisting with class/kindergarten projects
    • Individual support planned within the kindergarten/school
    • Organizing and possibly carrying out minor repairs to play equipment
    • Promoting and supporting therapeutic measures
    • Escort services and assistance in maintaining or expanding social contacts: accompanying to doctors or therapies, visits and events; accompanying for errands and walks; activities such as reading, playing; assistance with active sports; other assistance to maintain contacts.

    What is not allowed:

    • Tasks that pose a danger to volunteers and/or those being supervised are not allowed.
    • Volunteers should never have sole responsibility. This means that volunteers are not allowed to take sole supervision of a group. The responsibility for supervision remains with the responsible specialist staff.
  • Medical and Nursing Sector

    Institutions in the medical and nursing sector can include:

    • Hospitals
    • Nursing homes
    • Senior living facilities
    • Rehabilitation clinics ...

    You should:

    • Learn about tasks and functions in nursing fields.
    • Familiarize yourself with the structure and organization of your workplace.
    • Learn about the duties of employees and eventually perform some of them after training.
    • Understand the nursing philosophy of the institution and its corporate philosophy.
    • Participate in nursing handovers, ward rounds, supervision, etc.
    • Be able to ensure the independence of those in need of assistance.
    • Learn tolerance regarding individual life circumstances of those seeking help.
    • Be capable of acting responsibly on your own.

    Tasks can be quite specific, including:

    In caregiving:

    • Participation in the planning and execution of group activities (games, crafts, reading, accompanying outings and walks).
    • Engaging in leisure activities with the individuals being cared for.
    • Accompanying and supporting outings and celebrations.
    • Promotion and support of therapeutic measures.
    • Escort services and assistance in maintaining or establishing social contacts (accompanying to the doctor, events, shopping, sports, etc.).

    In elderly or nursing care:

    • Basic care tasks include personal hygiene (partial/full body washing, showering/bathing, intimate hygiene, dental/oral care, combing, shaving).
    • Assistance with excretion (urination, defecation, arranging clothing, changing small pads).
    • Nutrition (preparing and serving meals and beverages for patients without swallowing disorders).
    • Mobility (simple assistance with getting up/going to bed, repositioning, dressing/undressing, walking, standing).
    • Housekeeping services (making beds correctly, disinfecting soiled beds, maintaining the patient's home or environment, managing households in an economical and environmentally conscious manner).
    • Assistance with housekeeping tasks, such as preparing food with appropriate preparation and follow-up.

    What is not allowed:

    • Tasks that pose a danger to volunteers and/or those in need of assistance should not be performed.
    • Volunteers should not be solely responsible.
    • Tasks related to medical care, such as taking body temperature, pulse, blood pressure, medical rubs, medical baths, inhalations, applying cold packs, inserting nasal gastric tubes, administering tube feeding and fluids through a feeding tube, administering medication, injections, hanging intravenous drips, wound care and dressing changes, applying compression bandages, inserting and changing urinary catheters, enemas, enemas, stoma care, bronchial secretion suction.

    Please note that this information provides an overview and that specific tasks and responsibilities may vary depending on the institution and the individual's level of training and experience.

  • Emergency Services

    Before starting your volunteer service, you also undergo training as a paramedic:

    • The paramedic training lasts for three months (including theory, clinical internship, and ambulance station internship).
    • The training costs are covered by the German Red Cross (DRK).
    • During the training, you won't receive a stipend or allowance, but you will have liability insurance coverage.
    • You can continue to be covered under your family's health insurance during the training.
    • You will have the status of a student and be eligible for child benefits.
    • The DRK Education Institute coordinates the organization of the training, including assigning clinical placements, etc.
    • You will receive the training schedule and details from your ambulance station, where you can also discuss further aspects of the training.
    • You will need to sign a "repayment contract" with your ambulance station. If you terminate your service early, you may be required to reimburse a portion of the training costs.

    After completing the training, you will become a fully qualified paramedic.

    Specific tasks during your service can include:

    • Transporting patients, providing patient transportation services, and potentially participating in emergency responses.
    • Taking care of the vehicles and maintaining, disinfecting, and restocking the necessary materials.
    • Monitoring vital signs of patients.
    • Providing medical initial care to patients when necessary.
    • Assisting paramedics when required.
    • Documenting and recording post-mission activities and reports.

     

Tasks at your Placement Site

In general, your placement can look a bit different in each location compared to another. Furthermore, you can also incorporate your own interests and strengths, so your placement can be quite different from that of your predecessor. If you are unsure about a task, whether or how you can fulfill it, always be sure to talk to your supervisor at the placement. The placement has the professional oversight, meaning overall responsibility for your placement. If you want to discuss things further, reach out to your education coordinator at the Red Cross. 

In general, we have provided you with a brief overview here of what to expect in the various areas and what not.

  • Pedagogical Sector

    Institutions in the pedagogical sector can include:

    • Schools (full-time, primary school, special school, secondary school)
    • Kindergartens
    • After-school care centers
    • Youth centers
    • Family Help Centers
    • ...

    You should:

    • Get to know the different educational styles and goals in your institution
    • Experience "closeness and distance" to the people you're supervising
    • Discover your own limits and strengths
    • Learn various pedagogical methods
    • Be able to integrate your personality into the daily work.

    Tasks can be quite specific, such as:

    • Assisting in the planning, preparation, and execution of group activities, such as games, crafts, reading, break-time activities, media design, and accompanying outings.
    • Organizing recreational activities with the people you are supervising
    • Practicing practical life skills, such as personal hygiene and handling money and material values
    • Accompanying and assisting with outings and events
    • Supporting homework supervision
    • Assisting with extracurricular activities
    • Supporting lunchtime care
    • Assisting with class/kindergarten projects
    • Individual support planned within the kindergarten/school
    • Organizing and possibly carrying out minor repairs to play equipment
    • Promoting and supporting therapeutic measures
    • Escort services and assistance in maintaining or expanding social contacts: accompanying to doctors or therapies, visits and events; accompanying for errands and walks; activities such as reading, playing; assistance with active sports; other assistance to maintain contacts.

    What is not allowed:

    • Tasks that pose a danger to volunteers and/or those being supervised are not allowed.
    • Volunteers should never have sole responsibility. This means that volunteers are not allowed to take sole supervision of a group. The responsibility for supervision remains with the responsible specialist staff.
  • Medical and Nursing Sector

    Institutions in the medical and nursing sector can include:

    • Hospitals
    • Nursing homes
    • Senior living facilities
    • Rehabilitation clinics ...

    You should:

    • Learn about tasks and functions in nursing fields.
    • Familiarize yourself with the structure and organization of your workplace.
    • Learn about the duties of employees and eventually perform some of them after training.
    • Understand the nursing philosophy of the institution and its corporate philosophy.
    • Participate in nursing handovers, ward rounds, supervision, etc.
    • Be able to ensure the independence of those in need of assistance.
    • Learn tolerance regarding individual life circumstances of those seeking help.
    • Be capable of acting responsibly on your own.

    Tasks can be quite specific, including:

    In caregiving:

    • Participation in the planning and execution of group activities (games, crafts, reading, accompanying outings and walks).
    • Engaging in leisure activities with the individuals being cared for.
    • Accompanying and supporting outings and celebrations.
    • Promotion and support of therapeutic measures.
    • Escort services and assistance in maintaining or establishing social contacts (accompanying to the doctor, events, shopping, sports, etc.).

    In elderly or nursing care:

    • Basic care tasks include personal hygiene (partial/full body washing, showering/bathing, intimate hygiene, dental/oral care, combing, shaving).
    • Assistance with excretion (urination, defecation, arranging clothing, changing small pads).
    • Nutrition (preparing and serving meals and beverages for patients without swallowing disorders).
    • Mobility (simple assistance with getting up/going to bed, repositioning, dressing/undressing, walking, standing).
    • Housekeeping services (making beds correctly, disinfecting soiled beds, maintaining the patient's home or environment, managing households in an economical and environmentally conscious manner).
    • Assistance with housekeeping tasks, such as preparing food with appropriate preparation and follow-up.

    What is not allowed:

    • Tasks that pose a danger to volunteers and/or those in need of assistance should not be performed.
    • Volunteers should not be solely responsible.
    • Tasks related to medical care, such as taking body temperature, pulse, blood pressure, medical rubs, medical baths, inhalations, applying cold packs, inserting nasal gastric tubes, administering tube feeding and fluids through a feeding tube, administering medication, injections, hanging intravenous drips, wound care and dressing changes, applying compression bandages, inserting and changing urinary catheters, enemas, enemas, stoma care, bronchial secretion suction.

    Please note that this information provides an overview and that specific tasks and responsibilities may vary depending on the institution and the individual's level of training and experience.

  • Emergency Services

    Before starting your volunteer service, you also undergo training as a paramedic:

    • The paramedic training lasts for three months (including theory, clinical internship, and ambulance station internship).
    • The training costs are covered by the German Red Cross (DRK).
    • During the training, you won't receive a stipend or allowance, but you will have liability insurance coverage.
    • You can continue to be covered under your family's health insurance during the training.
    • You will have the status of a student and be eligible for child benefits.
    • The DRK Education Institute coordinates the organization of the training, including assigning clinical placements, etc.
    • You will receive the training schedule and details from your ambulance station, where you can also discuss further aspects of the training.
    • You will need to sign a "repayment contract" with your ambulance station. If you terminate your service early, you may be required to reimburse a portion of the training costs.

    After completing the training, you will become a fully qualified paramedic.

    Specific tasks during your service can include:

    • Transporting patients, providing patient transportation services, and potentially participating in emergency responses.
    • Taking care of the vehicles and maintaining, disinfecting, and restocking the necessary materials.
    • Monitoring vital signs of patients.
    • Providing medical initial care to patients when necessary.
    • Assisting paramedics when required.
    • Documenting and recording post-mission activities and reports.